Views & Opinions

 

IN DEFENCE OF THE WHITE MEDIA AGENDA

By SANDILE MEMELA

WE WRITERS and journalists rule the society. We are powerful beyond measure.
Everything that the ordinary white folk and educated blacks know comes from us. We shape and influence the perception and control their thinking.
Over the last 23 years, we have refined the art of black bashing. It has become an art.
Of course, we are not objective, accurate or fair in what we write, how we portray black people, especially the Zuma government, ministers and the state-owned entities.
They make it easier for us with their tendency to score own goals. They commit sins and mistakes like all leaders everywhere in the world, including Britain, America and Europe.
But you see the thing with Zuma and his ministers are that they are black. There is an image of blacks that have been created. We the media must preserve it.
Blacks are incapable, corrupt and destructive. They are not to be trusted.
It is our responsibility as writers and journalists employed and handled by supremacist capitalists to attack and denigrate Zuma’s government. That is what we get paid to do. Period.
So when some smart ass black intellectual alleges that we lack objectivity and are unfair, we pretend that we don’t know what they are talking about.
Worse if they write and submit an article to that effect, with all the evidence, we cannot run it. We spike it, throw it into the bin.
Always remember what John Swinton,
former Chief of Staff of the most powerful and prestigious newspaper on earth, The New York Times, when asked to give a toast to the “free press” at the New York Press Club:
“There is no such thing, at this date of the world’s history, in America, as an independent press. You know it and I know it.
There is not one of you who dares to write your honest opinions, and if you did, you know beforehand that it would never appear in print. I am paid weekly for keeping my honest opinion out of the paper I am connected with.
Others of you are paid similar salaries for similar things, and any of you who would be so foolish as to write honest opinions would be out on the streets looking for another job.
If I allowed my honest opinions to appear in one issue of my paper, before twenty-four hours my occupation would be gone.
The business of the journalists is to destroy the truth; to lie outright; to pervert; to vilify; to fawn at the feet of mammon, and to sell his country and his race for his daily bread.
You know it and I know it and what folly is this toasting an independent press? We are the tools and vassals of rich men behind the scenes.
We are the jumping jacks, they pull the strings and we dance. Our talents, our possibilities and our lives are all the property of other men.
We are intellectual prostitutes.”
That is the power of being a journalist, editor or owning the media. You use your whims to make decisions.you do as you are told.
Look, they would be making a good point like the fact that ‘objectivity is a myth.’
Few people must know that journalism is not a science but a trade. It is not even a profession. But we must present it as such.
It is important to keep the mind especially of white folks and the black elite blind.
Much as they have eyes, they must remain blind to the economic inequality, land dispossession, rampant prejudice and racism and the lack of compassion in society.
When they look at South Africa they must not understand what is going on. It must be through the eyes of the media.
We know that prejudice and stereotypes about Zuma, the government and black people, in general, are buried deep in the stories we write and the images we beam. We must be complex and sophisticated about how we do that.
This is what we do as the media: perpetuate racism and protect supremacist interests. The economic status quo must be preserved, at all costs.
How could it be any other way?
We have some of the most talented writers to determine the national discourse in this country. They come with great titles for books.
For example, What If There Were No Whites! This is hardly a neutral or objective title.
But you have to understand that we have to promote black dependency. We must make whites seem indispensable saviours with the power to save black from themselves.
The blacks must be treated as children. They must believe that they cannot do anything for themselves without whites.
Every educated black must be haunted by one question: are blacks cursed? This must become a rhetorical question. They must intuitively know the answer.
After all, everything they read or write is subjected to our approval. We own publishing.
Look apartheid has done a great job to make blacks become irresponsible, ill-disciplined and uncaring, especially on their own.
The good thing is that they have developed the habit of not doing things for themselves, now.
Yes, blacks are incapable of self-rule. They must always be reporting to someone, especially from outside their group.
Even during the days of the Bantustans – barren independent mini-states – they could not make things happen for themselves.
That was the idea: empty them of self-responsibility to entirely depend on whites.
The magic bullet effect of the media was, intentionally, to turn black leadership and it’s elites into consumers.
We fed them news and features that would make them aspire to be like whites.
As you can see, now, their tastes, preferences, political belief, values, outlook, class and money are exactly like those of whites.
The only criterion for black success and achievement is to live like whites.
No matter what they achieve, their success and status must make them ngamlas, that is, whites in black skins.
Most importantly, they have internalized prejudice against blacks and do not have faith, hope and belief in Zuma and his government.
Despite their much vaunted Steve Bantu Biko and his Black Consciousness, we must empty them of self-pride. Blacks must neither trust blacks nor support each other.
Well, it has been 23 years of so-called democracy, now. The position of the white minority has not changed and must not change. The status quo must be preserved.
In fact, the minority has become a majority simply because we have won blacks to our way of thinking and living. We have taken over their mind.
This Biko was right when he said: the greatest weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.
Frankly, that is why we killed him. He was no Nelson Mandela.
The only black editors and journalists must be those who are on the side of supremacist capitalists.
Yes, we must recreate and rei vent John Tango Jabavu, the founder of Imvo zaba Nsundu.
Black media professionals, if we must call them that, must work for and side with the exploiters and oppressors.
They must devote their time and energy to attacking Zuma and his government at every given opportunity.
Even when he tries to speak in Zulu, we must immediately translate to hear his thinking.
Zuma is not a president. We the media have reduced him to a commodity. He is what sells our products, that is, newspapers and books and radio talk shows.
Look at how the most recent books are trailblazers.
In fact, we want every white journalist and academic to produce a book on Zuma or any of his ministers and or government.
The motive is to mold and shape how whites and the black elite view the ANC government.
The latter must be crippled and forced into a coalition. By 2019, we want the ANC out of power.
We have The Presidents Keepers and Enemy of the People. They are the very latest sensation.
Both are destined to do very well among readers as they confirm white prejudice: blacks are corrupt and destroying the country.
If you smart you will see the incestuous relationship between journalism, media and business. The one feeds into the other.
But I will not amplify on this point. It gives too much away.
However, we will defend any journalist who is threatened for whatever reason. We will wave court interdicts and demand freedom of the media and expression.
We will reject and defy their right of reply.
We will use that obfuscation to promote, protect and preserve ourselves and the legacy of our European ancestors.
Yes, it was whites that introduced journalism into this society.
As editors, journalists and the media, we do not answer to any man, including the President.
We are a law unto ourselves. For that, we must thank our white academics and intellectuals who have been mistaken for revolutionaries. They own and write ANC policy.
But one thing that must be clear: this is our country. We love the flag. We love the country. Yes, we love Mandela beyond the grave.
We designed and drew the flag. The rainbow (nation) does not feature the colour black. But yes we must espouse non-racism.
Of course, you may want to know where black media ownership, editors, journalists and writers feature in all this.
Do we have to discuss this?
Those who know will ask: who
do black journalists report to? Where do so-called black media owners get their money?
We have to create the myth of independence and freedom for so-called black-owned media.
The so-called independent black media gets its story ideas from us. We set the agenda.
For a black journalist to be a hero, they must be seen to be fighting for their people.
To be seen to be doing this they must, at every given opportunity, attack anything associated with Zuma and his government.
This is what must occupy the minds of the black elite: Zuma must go!
The good thing is not just that Zuma sells. It is that blacks spend time discussing and dissing him. They must repeat our lies to themselves.
Thus they have no time to focus on anything else to take themselves forward.
We said black leaders are their worst enemies. Through their mistakes and sins, they make things easy for us, feeding media stories.
Take the book Khwezi, for instance. It is a piece of cake. The author is a great h
shero now.
The perspective is not to tell the story of this black woman and how her family contributed to the liberation struggle.
Instead, Khwezi must be reduced to a rape victim. Her family must be forgotten as symbols of black resistance.
This rape-victim perspective perpetuates the best image of the black man: a rapacious beast.
This is not just about the black man who can’t keep his pants zipped up.
Anyone that writes such a story – black or white – will surely be rewarded with prestige, honour and status.
Also, don’t forget who the judges are when it comes to media competition and awards. We the media owners pay for that. It is an investment.
We the media simply do not believe in objectivity or Truth.
In fact, as owners, we always want editors, journalists and writers around who will make us feel comfortable.
All the better if they like playing tennis, golf or schmoozing at lunch. They must drink a lot.
We own this country and must protect our interests.
We don’t want any militant black radicals with silly Black Consciousness or Pan Africanist ideas with whom we will have to watch our languages.
We want sycophants who will laugh or play deaf when we blurt out the dreaded K-word.
Nobody should be offended by white racism.
Well, most of the pioneers of Black Consciousness have been eradicated from the newsrooms.
There is not and must be not a single publication or institution that espouses Black Consciousness.
What we have now are bloody sycophants who do as they are told. The handful black media owners are only interested in money.
These are fine young men and women who know which side their bread is buttered. Most of the time, they are willing to sell… the soul of black folks.
They are only interested in the false status bestowed by a picture byline and appearing on TV.
Neither do they question authority? In fact, they have become part of a history and system they fought against.
Above all, they too want to live well like whites with homes in the suburbs, children in white school, double garages and English as a home language.
Bantu Stephens Biko is dead, especially his spirit. His peers have been sucked into the corrupt government.
Nobody remembers that Biko used to write for a community newsletter. He was a people’s journalist if you like.
But as for his BC comrades, they too love money more than their people. Money and what it can buy makes people forget history.
Then good thing is we have identified and employed proper blacks to run the media.
We must continue to make sure they make the correct editorial decisions about how to cover Zuma, his government and black people, in general.
There must be a negative story a day. Yes, rape, papgeld, violence, corruption. If not, feed them stories on celebrities in entertainment or sports.
Even those who work for the SABC must share the white way of thinking.
Their values and orientation must be to see the black government as an enemy of the people.
Yes, Zuma government and blacks, in general, must be seen as a crime-prone and derelict. Every whiff of scandal must be blown up.
There will be no stories of black achievement telling the Good News about the miracle of Nelson Mandela country. The man is dead.
But maybe we are wrong or even self-delusional as white media.
Well, people will have to tell us WHY they think we may be wrong. This was intended to explain why certain things happen the way they do.
It is not a coincidence.
However, this is not a defence for the white media agenda. It is a simple explanation for our new recruits.
Well, as for the black media agenda… we wish some black upstart can tell us what is the agenda of black editors, journalists and the media owners.
I think they too wish to milk the state. It is what it is.
Media is a business not some crusader for economic justice, equality, justice and to support calls for the return of the land.
The business of business is business and business must be protected.

*Sandile Memela is a Journalist, Writer, Cultural Critic & Civil Servants.

REMEMBERING CHIEF ALBERT LUTHULI

Comrade Jacob Zuma the ANC president.

By Jacob Zuma 

Fifty years ago, our country lost one of its most illustrious sons and Africa’s first Nobel Peace Prize Laureate, Chief Albert Luthuli, under mysterious circumstances. The official report, which remains unconvincing to this day, was that he was run over by a train.  Given the brutality of the racist apartheid regime and its attitude to the leadership of the mass democratic movement, Chief Albert Luthuli’s death continues to be shrouded in suspicion, but he left behind a legacy of peace, nonracialism, freedom, justice and a better life for all.

By SANDILE MEMELA

WE WRITERS and journalists rule the society. We are powerful beyond measure.
Everything that the ordinary white folk and educated blacks know comes from us. We shape and influence the perception and control their thinking.
Over the last 23 years, we have refined the art of black bashing. It has become an art.
Of course, we are not objective, accurate or fair in what we write, how we portray black people, especially the Zuma government, ministers and the state-owned entities.
They make it easier for us with their tendency to score own goals. They commit sins and mistakes like all leaders everywhere in the world, including Britain, America and Europe.
But you see the thing with Zuma and his ministers are that they are black. There is an image of blacks that have been created. We the media must preserve it.
Blacks are incapable, corrupt and destructive. They are not to be trusted.
It is our responsibility as writers and journalists employed and handled by supremacist capitalists to attack and denigrate Zuma’s government. That is what we get paid to do. Period.
So when some smart ass black intellectual alleges that we lack objectivity and are unfair, we pretend that we don’t know what they are talking about.
Worse if they write and submit an article to that effect, with all the evidence, we cannot run it. We spike it, throw it into the bin.
Always remember what John Swinton,
former Chief of Staff of the most powerful and prestigious newspaper on earth, The New York Times, when asked to give a toast to the “free press” at the New York Press Club:
“There is no such thing, at this date of the world’s history, in America, as an independent press. You know it and I know it.
There is not one of you who dares to write your honest opinions, and if you did, you know beforehand that it would never appear in print. I am paid weekly for keeping my honest opinion out of the paper I am connected with.
Others of you are paid similar salaries for similar things, and any of you who would be so foolish as to write honest opinions would be out on the streets looking for another job.
If I allowed my honest opinions to appear in one issue of my paper, before twenty-four hours my occupation would be gone.
The business of the journalists is to destroy the truth; to lie outright; to pervert; to vilify; to fawn at the feet of mammon, and to sell his country and his race for his daily bread.
You know it and I know it and what folly is this toasting an independent press? We are the tools and vassals of rich men behind the scenes.
We are the jumping jacks, they pull the strings and we dance. Our talents, our possibilities and our lives are all the property of other men.
We are intellectual prostitutes.”
That is the power of being a journalist, editor or owning the media. You use your whims to make decisions.you do as you are told.
Look, they would be making a good point like the fact that ‘objectivity is a myth.’
Few people must know that journalism is not a science but a trade. It is not even a profession. But we must present it as such.
It is important to keep the mind especially of white folks and the black elite blind.
Much as they have eyes, they must remain blind to the economic inequality, land dispossession, rampant prejudice and racism and the lack of compassion in society.
When they look at South Africa they must not understand what is going on. It must be through the eyes of the media.
We know that prejudice and stereotypes about Zuma, the government and black people, in general, are buried deep in the stories we write and the images we beam. We must be complex and sophisticated about how we do that.
This is what we do as the media: perpetuate racism and protect supremacist interests. The economic status quo must be preserved, at all costs.
How could it be any other way?
We have some of the most talented writers to determine the national discourse in this country. They come with great titles for books.
For example, What If There Were No Whites! This is hardly a neutral or objective title.
But you have to understand that we have to promote black dependency. We must make whites seem indispensable saviours with the power to save black from themselves.
The blacks must be treated as children. They must believe that they cannot do anything for themselves without whites.
Every educated black must be haunted by one question: are blacks cursed? This must become a rhetorical question. They must intuitively know the answer.
After all, everything they read or write is subjected to our approval. We own publishing.
Look apartheid has done a great job to make blacks become irresponsible, ill-disciplined and uncaring, especially on their own.
The good thing is that they have developed the habit of not doing things for themselves, now.
Yes, blacks are incapable of self-rule. They must always be reporting to someone, especially from outside their group.
Even during the days of the Bantustans – barren independent mini-states – they could not make things happen for themselves.
That was the idea: empty them of self-responsibility to entirely depend on whites.
The magic bullet effect of the media was, intentionally, to turn black leadership and it’s elites into consumers.
We fed them news and features that would make them aspire to be like whites.
As you can see, now, their tastes, preferences, political belief, values, outlook, class and money are exactly like those of whites.
The only criterion for black success and achievement is to live like whites.
No matter what they achieve, their success and status must make them ngamlas, that is, whites in black skins.
Most importantly, they have internalized prejudice against blacks and do not have faith, hope and belief in Zuma and his government.
Despite their much vaunted Steve Bantu Biko and his Black Consciousness, we must empty them of self-pride. Blacks must neither trust blacks nor support each other.
Well, it has been 23 years of so-called democracy, now. The position of the white minority has not changed and must not change. The status quo must be preserved.
In fact, the minority has become a majority simply because we have won blacks to our way of thinking and living. We have taken over their mind.
This Biko was right when he said: the greatest weapon in the hands of the oppressor is the mind of the oppressed.
Frankly, that is why we killed him. He was no Nelson Mandela.
The only black editors and journalists must be those who are on the side of supremacist capitalists.
Yes, we must recreate and rei vent John Tango Jabavu, the founder of Imvo zaba Nsundu.
Black media professionals, if we must call them that, must work for and side with the exploiters and oppressors.
They must devote their time and energy to attacking Zuma and his government at every given opportunity.
Even when he tries to speak in Zulu, we must immediately translate to hear his thinking.
Zuma is not a president. We the media have reduced him to a commodity. He is what sells our products, that is, newspapers and books and radio talk shows.
Look at how the most recent books are trailblazers.
In fact, we want every white journalist and academic to produce a book on Zuma or any of his ministers and or government.
The motive is to mold and shape how whites and the black elite view the ANC government.
The latter must be crippled and forced into a coalition. By 2019, we want the ANC out of power.
We have The Presidents Keepers and Enemy of the People. They are the very latest sensation.
Both are destined to do very well among readers as they confirm white prejudice: blacks are corrupt and destroying the country.
If you smart you will see the incestuous relationship between journalism, media and business. The one feeds into the other.
But I will not amplify on this point. It gives too much away.
However, we will defend any journalist who is threatened for whatever reason. We will wave court interdicts and demand freedom of the media and expression.
We will reject and defy their right of reply.
We will use that obfuscation to promote, protect and preserve ourselves and the legacy of our European ancestors.
Yes, it was whites that introduced journalism into this society.
As editors, journalists and the media, we do not answer to any man, including the President.
We are a law into ourselves. For that, we must thank our white academics and intellectuals who have been mistaken for revolutionaries. They own and write ANC policy.
But one thing that must be clear: this is our country. We love the flag. We love the country. Yes, we love Mandela beyond the grave.
We designed and drew the flag. The rainbow (nation) does not feature the colour black. But yes we must espouse non-racism.
Of course, you may want to know where black media ownership, editors, journalists and writers feature in all this.
Do we have to discuss this?
Those who know will ask: who
do black journalists report to? Where do so-called black media owners get their money?
We have to create the myth of independence and freedom for so-called black-owned media.
The so-called independent black media gets its story ideas from us. We set the agenda.
For a black journalist to be a hero, they must be seen to be fighting for their people.
To be seen to be doing this they must, at every given opportunity, attack anything associated with Zuma and his government.
This is what must occupy the minds of the black elite: Zuma must go!
The good thing is not just that Zuma sells. It is that blacks spend time discussing and dissing him. They must repeat our lies to themselves.
Thus they have no time to focus on anything else to take themselves forward.
We said black leaders are their worst enemies. Through their mistakes and sins, they make things easy for us, feeding media stories.
Take the book Khwezi, for instance. It is a piece of cake. The author is a great h
shero now.
The perspective is not to tell the story of this black woman and how her family contributed to the liberation struggle.
Instead, Khwezi must be reduced to a rape victim. Her family must be forgotten as symbols of black resistance.
This rape-victim perspective perpetuates the best image of the black man: a rapacious beast.
This is not just about the black man who can’t keep his pants zipped up.
Anyone that writes such a story – black or white – will surely be rewarded with prestige, honour and status.
Also, don’t forget who the judges are when it comes to media competition and awards. We the media owners pay for that. It is an investment.
We the media simply do not believe in objectivity or Truth.
In fact, as owners, we always want editors, journalists and writers around who will make us feel comfortable.
All the better if they like playing tennis, golf or schmoozing at lunch. They must drink a lot.
We own this country and must protect our interests.
We don’t want any militant black radicals with silly Black Consciousness or Pan Africanist ideas with whom we will have to watch our languages.
We want sycophants who will laugh or play deaf when we blurt out the dreaded K-word.
Nobody should be offended by white racism.
Well, most of the pioneers of Black Consciousness have been eradicated from the newsrooms.
There is not and must be not a single publication or institution that espouses Black Consciousness.
What we have now are bloody sycophants who do as they are told. The handful black media owners are only interested in money.
These are fine young men and women who know which side their bread is buttered. Most of the time, they are willing to sell… the soul of black folks.
They are only interested in the false status bestowed by a picture byline and appearing on TV.
Neither do they question authority? In fact, they have become part of a history and system they fought against.
Above all, they too want to live well like whites with homes in the suburbs, children in white school, double garages and English as a home language.
Bantu Stephens Biko is dead, especially his spirit. His peers have been sucked into the corrupt government.
Nobody remembers that Biko used to write for a community newsletter. He was a people’s journalist if you like.
But as for his BC comrades, they too love money more than their people. Money and what it can buy makes people forget history.
Then good thing is we have identified and employed proper blacks to run the media.
We must continue to make sure they make the correct editorial decisions about how to cover Zuma, his government and black people, in general.
There must be a negative story a day. Yes, rape, papgeld, violence, corruption. If not, feed them stories on celebrities in entertainment or sports.
Even those who work for the SABC must share the white way of thinking.
Their values and orientation must be to see the black government as an enemy of the people.
Yes, Zuma government and blacks, in general, must be seen as a crime- prone and derelict. Every whiff of scandal must be blown up.
There will be no stories of black achievement telling the Good News about the miracle of Nelson Mandela country. The man is dead.
But maybe we are wrong or even self-delusional as white media.
Well, people will have to tell us WHY they think we may be wrong. This was intended to explain why certain things happen the way they do.
It is not a coincidence.
However, this is not a defence for the white media agenda. It is a simple explanation for our new recruits.
Well, as for the black media agenda… we wish some black upstart can tell us what is the agenda of black editors, journalists and the media owners.
I think they too wish to milk the state. It is what it is.
Media is a business not some crusader for economic justice, equality, justice and to support calls for the return of the land.
The business of business is business and business must be protected.

*Sandile Memela is a Journalist, Writer, Cultural Critic & Civil Servants.
A man of the people, he played various roles in the community, a traditional leader, preacher, Christian, teacher, college choirmaster, sports, particularly soccer and cultural activist and a sugar cane farmer. He knew many people across these fields, which lent a unique understanding in running the ANC. Luthuli was able to reconcile Communists and Nationalists in the organisation and trusted them alike, and made everybody in his National Executive Committee (NEC) comfortable. He was forthright about the trustworthiness and candour of the Communists when asked in the treason trial.

Chief Luthuli was a unifier in the organisation, advising people across racial lines including those progressive white people of the time when they wanted to form the Progressive Party. The apartheid government sought to silence him through all means possible, including stripping him of the chieftaincy and imposing banning orders, but these attempts only hardened his resolve to end apartheid.

His commitment to Africa and African unity was borne out in his receipt of the Nobel Peace Prize from the Norwegian Nobel Committee in 1960, which he accepted in 1961.

He stated with humility:

“This Award could not be for me alone, nor for just South Africa, but for Africa as a whole”.

He outlined the ANC’s belief in non-racialism, including how it was guiding the country towards this goal in spite of the difficulties. He stated that the racism problem in the country was acute compared to other parts of Africa, “asserted with greater vigour and determination and a sense of righteousness”’.

Such racism against black people, he added, would justify feelings of hatred and a desire for revenge against whites, but that the ANC had chosen the path of non-racialism for the country. He declared:

Our vision has always been that of a non-racial democratic South Africa which upholds the rights of all who live in our country to remain there as full citizens with equal rights and responsibilities with all others. For the consummation of this ideal, we have laboured unflinchingly. We shall continue to labour unflinchingly”.

As our country’s experiment with constitutional democracy continues, this is the one key lesson that we must take to heart from Chief Luthuli even during difficult moments when we feel the non-racial project is faltering. We all have a responsibility to build a non-racial society and to unite all our people, black and white. Chief Luthuli is a symbol of peace and unity and in his memory, we must recommit to the South Africa he envisaged.

He outlined this vision as follows in his Nobel Peace Prize lecture;

“In government, we will not be satisfied with anything less than direct individual adult suffrage and the right to stand for and be elected to all organs of government. 

“In economic matters, we will be satisfied with nothing less than equality of opportunity in every sphere, and the enjoyment by all of those heritages which form the resources of the country which up to now have been appropriated on a racial ‘whites only’ basis. In culture, we will be satisfied with nothing less than the opening of all doors of learning to non-segregatory institutions on the sole criterion of ability. 

“In the social sphere, we will be satisfied with nothing less than the abolition of all racial bars”.

Luthuli evinced an internationalist outlook of our struggle and acknowledged the international contribution while also affirming the responsibility of South Africans to be their own liberators. He emphasised: “Whatever may be the future of our freedom efforts, our cause is the cause of the liberation of people who are denied freedom. Only on this basis can the peace of Africa and the world be firmly founded. Our cause is the cause of equality between nations and people”. 

Most importantly, he uttered the profound words of the need for the courage that rises with danger. I have no doubt that despite the challenges of persisting poverty; he would equally be encouraged by the level of progress made since the dawn of democracy in 1994, that we have almost reached the universal primary education threshold, ahead of many other developing nations. He would also be happy that we have managed to expand our social safety net in terms of housing, grants, and provision of basic services to indigent families for free and that we have provided financial assistance to over 12 million students through the National Student Financial Aid Scheme.

Chief Luthuli would, without a doubt, appreciate our comprehensive HIV and AIDS antiretroviral national programme, without which millions would have died.  The rate of HIV infection remains unacceptably high with an estimated over 2 000 new infections a week. Young people aged 15 to 25 are the most vulnerable. In his memory, we urge especially our young people to practice safe sex and to refrain from it where possible until they are ready to settle and build strong families.

In Chief Luthuli, we celebrate a contribution in the struggle against patriarchy. As Inkosi of the AmaKholwa people, he invited women in the village to participate in civil affairs and in the actual conflict resolution deliberations at the time when this was unusual.  By that time, women had just gained the right to become members of the ANC NEC. Lillian Ngoyi had been elected as the first woman to join the ANC NEC in 1956. His courageous views inspired his successor, Comrade Oliver Tambo to agitate without fail for women’s rights. It is thus fitting that we remember Luthuli, just like OR Tambo, as a staunch champion of gender equality. While we have made considerable progress on the gender equality front, Luthuli would have been deeply pained by the high levels of violent crime against women and children in our society today. We will continue to take positive measures and work closely with the communities to root out this scourge.

We commemorated the International Nelson Mandela Day this month. In this regard, and as Chief Luthuli would have implored us, the values of our Constitution that so many sacrificed for, should provide us with the moral and ethical foundation from which we can draw sustenance and a sense of purpose. These values have a universal appeal as they are premised on Ubuntu – the sense that our survival and well-being is interdependent – that I am because we are. Chief Luthuli was a practical exponent of these values as exemplified in his quest for equality, especially gender equality, non-racialism, openness, respect and his fervent fight against all manifestation of tribalism. The values of respect, selflessness, openness and accountability all epitomise who Chief Luthuli was.

We are therefore duty-bound to learn from him and find ways in which his ideas and values can find a practical expression in our day to day lives.  Through the efforts of the   Luthuli family and the Luthuli Museum management, future generations will be able to find out more about this gentle giant of our struggle and icon of the African continent. Although we lost him under suspicious circumstances, his legacy lives for future generations to learn and build on: to make ours a united, non-racial, non-sexist and prosperous society.

*Comrade Jacob Zuma is the President of the African National Congress and the President of the Republic of South Africa.This column was first published in ANC TODAY the online voice of the African National Congress on 28 July 2017.

Gaddafi’s Last Official Speech!!!

 I do not wish to die, but if it comes to that, to save this land, my people, all the thousands who are all my children, then so be it…

Moammar Gadhafi was killed by the Western Imperialists for oil.

 

In the name of Allah, the …beneficent, the merciful…

For 40 years, or was it longer, I can’t remember, I did all I could to give people houses, hospitals, schools, and when they were hungry, I gave them food. I even made Benghazi into farmland from the desert, I stood up to attacks from that cowboy Ronald Reagan when he killed my adopted orphaned daughter, he was trying to kill me, instead, he killed that poor innocent child. Then I helped my brothers and sisters from Africa with money for the African Union.

I did all I could to help people Understand the concept of real democracy, where people’s committees ran our country. But that was never enough, as some told me, even people who had 10 room homes, new suits and furniture, were never satisfied, as selfish as they were they wanted more. They told Americans and other visitors, that they needed “democracy” and “freedom” never realizing it was a cut throat system, where the biggest dog eats the rest, but they were enchanted with those words, never realizing that in America, there was no free medicine, no free hospitals, no free housing, no free education and no free food, except when people had to beg or go to long lines to get soup.

No, no matter what I did, it was never enough for some, but for others, they knew I was the son of Gamal Abdel Nasser, the only true Arab and Muslim leader we’ve had since Salah-al-Deen, when he claimed the Suez Canal for his people, as I claimed Libya, for my people, it was his footsteps I tried to follow, to keep my people free from colonial domination – from thieves who would steal from us.

Now, I am under attack by the biggest force in military history, my little African son, Obama wants to kill me, to take away the freedom of our country, to take away our free housing, our free medicine, our free education, our free food, and replace it with American style thievery, called “capitalism” ,but all of us in the Third World know what that means, it means corporations run the countries, run the world, and the people suffer.

So, there is no alternative for me, I must make my stand, and if Allah wishes, I shall die by following His path, the path that has made our country rich with farmland, with food and health, and even allowed us to help our African and Arab brothers and sisters.

I do not wish to die, but if it comes to that, to save this land, my people, all the thousands who are all my children, then so be it.

Let this testament be my voice to the world, that I stood up to crusader attacks of NATO, stood up to cruelty, stood up to betrayal, stood up to the West and its colonialist ambitions, and that I stood with my African brothers, my true Arab and Muslim brothers, as a beacon of light.

When others were building castles, I lived in a modest house, and in a tent. I never forgot my youth in Sirte, I did not spend our national treasury foolishly, and like Salah-al-Deen, our great Muslim leader, who rescued Jerusalem for Islam, I took little for myself…

In the West, some have called me “mad”, “crazy”, but they know the truth yet continue to lie, they know that our land is independent and free, not in the colonial grip, that my vision, my path, is, and has been clear and for my people and that I will fight to my last breath to keep us free, may Allah almighty help us to remain faithful and free.

“The leadership must be chosen on the strength of its quality…”

Sihle Zikalala has stated that the leadership must be chosen on the strength of its quality and not the position they hold.

By SIHLE ZIKALALA

The African National Congress in KwaZulu-Natal has recently concluded a very successful Provincial General Council.  The Council was honoured by the presence of the President of our movement, other NEC members, branch delegates, the ANC Leagues, the Alliance and other invited guests.  Musa Dladla Region in our Province was a commendable host of the PGC and worked hard to make it visible to all that the ANC was gathering there.

I have no doubt in my mind that as we rise from the PGC, we can all agree that we are wiser than we were when we met two days ago and therefore ready to advance our policy positions as we go to the National Policy Conference.

Emerging from the Provincial General Council is a contingent of cadres and activists prepared to confront perennial challenges of poverty, unemployment and inequality. As was asserted by the President, the enemy continues to live and fighting irrespective of whether or not we recognised its permanent presence.

We want to state without any hesitation that, today in our country there is a convergence of forces who share a common short goal which is to remove President Jacob Zuma and ANC but do not share a common objective on what happens in the aftermath.

That’s what makes these forces to be even more dangerous, illogical and unreliable. Placing any trust on them is a very serious risk for future of the people and that of generations to come. Therefore, being a member and a cadre of the movement requires people who are constantly engaged in a study of the revolution, factors that influence it and the role of revolutionaries to shape it in the best interests of our revolutionary cause.

Therefore, the journey does not end here as we rise from the PGC.  We need to pay sufficient attention to the state of the organisation and avoid the temptation of allowing our individual conduct and desire to tarnish the image and standing of the ANC.

As we said at the start of the PGC, the ANC is a movement and the parliament of the people.  It exists solely to serve and service the people. It continued existence is dependent on the trust that people continue to bestow on it. As Moses Kotane once said, “the revolution is about the people and the people can be stolen”. Therefore, we must at all times refuse to project the people’s movement, through our conduct and articulations, as a movement that is self-serving.

We should also never fall prey into a fallacy of thinking that the ANC is immune from natural processes that characterise any society.  All societies do not consist of things, but of processes that bring things into and out of being. This is a dialectical relationship between the cause and effects in society.

The ANC came into being as a result of struggles of the people.  If, because of our conduct, people come to the determination, wittingly or unwittingly, that their struggles can best be pursued outside the ANC, the ANC will become irrelevant and eventually cease to exist.  When the ANC ceases to exist, the gains of the revolution will be reversed and future generations will, correctly, put the entire blame on our shoulders. At that point, people will be stolen.

The motive forces of the National Democratic Revolution remains the working class, rural poor, middle strata who stands to benefit from the continuing struggle to build a National Democratic Society. These forces are characterised as Africans in particular and Blacks in general. As a consequence, all our actions must be directed to the liberation of this important segment of society.

As we continue to navigate through the difficult times facing our movement and the revolution, we must never lose hope even in the face complex circumstances and difficult moments. The ANC President, on the first day of the PGC, took us into the memory lane about what it means to be a cadre of the movement.

The articulation by the President is in line with the teachings of Chairman Mao Zedong that “what is correct inevitably develops in the course of the struggle with what is wrong.  The true, the good and the beautiful always exists by contrast with the false, the evil and the ugly, and grow in the struggle with them.  As soon as something erroneous is rejected and a particular truth accepted by mankind, new truths begin to struggle with the new errors.  Such struggle will never end.”

As we prosecute the people’s struggle under the ever-changing conditions, we must continue to sharpen our tools of analyses so that we are able to distinguish the trees from woods, weed from flagrant flowers and avoid accrediting the relative with the features of the absolute. This we will do and succeed in doing if we keep the African National Congress deeply rooted among the masses of our people. There must be no difference between the ANC and the masses of our people, both in thinking and articulation of our aspirations.

As we surge forward with a struggle for radical economic transformation, we must fully appreciate the fact that we pursue a struggle under the conditions characterised by antagonistic contradictions at play.

As observed by Karl Marx and Frederick Engels in the Communist Manifesto “the history of all hitherto existing society is the history of class struggles…the oppressor and oppressed stood in constant opposition to one another, carried on an uninterrupted, now hidden, now open fight, that each time ended either in the revolutionary reconstitution of society at large or in the common ruin of the contending classes.”

While appreciating this fundamental reality, in South African the national question became the primary contradiction to be resolved to attain a non-racial, non-sexist, democratic, united and prosperous society. This has always been understood not as the postponement of the class struggle but the interconnectedness of the class struggle and the resolution of the national question.

Twenty-three years into democracy the uninterrupted battle between the contending classes in South Africa is now an open fight.  The oppressor is uncomfortable with the project of radical economic transformation which is an immediate agenda and light for the oppressed class – as represented by the ANC. This is a permanent war which President Jacob Zuma aptly referred to during his address to this Provincial General Council.

Because of this unending and uninterrupted battle, an economic warfare has been unleashed against the ANC and its government – hence our economy has been put into junk status by the rating agencies.  We understand this to be an economic warfare because the decisions to downgrade the economy of our country were taken not on the basis of the soundness of our economic policies but on political considerations after the President exercised his constitutional prerogative to re-constitute the cabinet.

We are raising these points so that as revolutionaries we are able to distinguish the challenges of our own making and those brought to us by the objective environment, even if they coincide with our own internal subjective dynamics negatively impacting upon the pace of change.

How are we then expected to understand the sudden desire by some in the Congress movement to cooperate with the counter-revolution?  As revolution teaches us, a conscious of a person is not determined by a function of a mind but by his/her surrounding objective conditions.

Indeed because of the successes of our revolution, there are some in the movement who have recorded rapid growth in life either as a result of policies of the democratic government or were deliberately and purposely co-opted by the White Monopoly Capital so that it appears to be concerned with African people, while the intention is to serve its agenda.  It is these comrades who today have sponsored bravery to tell us that there is no white monopoly capital and that the agenda for radical economic transformation is a reckless agenda that will upset the private capital.

The crippling danger of conformism needs to be confronted. Clearly, they are those who see nothing wrong with the current economic status quo and they have pick-bagged on subjective challenges to further their own ambitions. For them, any change in the structure of the economy represents adventurism or recklessness. In this context, the pursuit of radical economic transformation should simultaneously include fighting corruption. Both resisting Radical Economic Transformation needs to be confronted and uprooted from the movement and all spheres of government.

We have decided to labour on this point so that we all have a common understanding of the real challenge we are facing and not fall prey to the agenda sold to us by the enemy.

As we move to the policy conference to be held later this week, we must buttress the project of radical economic transformation with decisiveness and policy positions that will wrestle the economy from the hands of the few white males.  We need to move with speed to economically empower the majority of our country – the Africans in particular.

Our Political Overview lifted up some key policy proposals that we need to advance and some those have become the resolutions of this Provincial General Council. Among others, the PGC has agreed on the followings:

We are unanimous in our view that there can be no progress without a strong and united African National Congress,

We are firm and unanimous on the importance of land redistribution without compensation,

We are firm and unanimous on the necessity to advance the Radical Economic Transformation,

We are firm on our view that free and quality education up to the first degree is the correct way to lead the skill revolution and build human capital needed for a developmental state,

We are firm on our position that the renewal of the National Liberation Movement is not an option, but a revolutionary imperative for continued survival of the movement,

We are firm and unanimous that as part of strengthening the Head Quarters, we will advocate, in addition to other NEC members to be full-time, for an amendment of the constitution to accommodate the existence of two Deputy Secretaries General, one responsible for Monitoring, Evaluation and Research and another one for Organization Building and Campaigns,

We are committing ourselves to rise above parochial provincial interests if any of them compromises the unity of the ANC,

As the PGC, we are unanimous on the principles that should inform the selection and election of leadership. Revolutionaries are not born but constructed by the struggles of our people, not by positions they hold in the revolution. As KwaZulu-Natal, we do not subscribe to the notion the election of a Deputy President implies that that comrade is automatically ordained to be a successor to the incumbent. If it was so they would be no need for elections.

 

In addition to such an unwritten tradition, the leadership election should be driven by the strategic tasks of that moment and the quality of the available pool of leadership, rather than a supposedly natural selection due to the current leadership position. The assertion that a deputy is an inherent successor to the incumbent is devoid of scientific analysis of the tasks of the current phase of NDR and suitability of leadership quality and character to lead the movement in that phase of the struggle.

If this must be a principle position in the movement then it has to be universally applicable rather self-serving and convenience because of conferences. The leadership must be chosen on the strength of its quality and not the position they hold.

I would like to express our revolutionary gratitude to the ANC Branch delegates, RECs, Leagues and Alliance partners for making the Provincial General Council a resounding success. All of us made a profound statement that the unity of the African National Congress is sacrosanct. I know that all of us are committed to ensuring that this undertaking does not become an empty statement.

On our collective shoulders lies a heavy obligation to ensure that future generations do not pass a judgement on us as a contingent of activists who betrayed the undertaking we signed upon joining the ANC.  Once again, history and reality impose the duty on all of us a revolutionary duty to maintain a dynamic contact with the masses of our people. In this, the Year of Oliver Tambo, let us as KwaZulu-Natal deepen the unity of the movement.

The struggle continues!!!

#The writer Sihle Zikalala is the ANC, KZN Provincial chairperson.